IT PAYS TO BE BAD

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October 5, 2012 by misterblank22

One of the most successful video game franchises in history is Grand Theft Auto. The series embodies everything that is considered wrong in society, killing, prostitutes, stealing, shooting, corruption and deception. The series has come under fire from people who like to force the blame of society’s problems on video games. Society’s problems don’t come from a game; they come from far more dangerous places then computer graphics.

Grand Theft Auto proves that it pays to be bad not just in the gameplay but in the game itself. When GTA III came out in 2001 it broke the rules, every single rule. It was banned by parents and government officials. So what do people do when something is bad or banned? They flock to it like its candy. Grand Theft Auto 3 was the kid in school who wore a leather jacket with a switch blade in his pocket that every girl had an attraction to. They’d jump on the back of his motorcycle and go wherever he wanted to go. We as gamers were all girls on the back of GTA III’s motorcycle. We did whatever it told us to do. “Steal a car!” You’d steal a car. “Kill my wife and bring her back so I can make her into dog food!” Ok, but do I get paid? The answer was always yes.

He is everything that is cool, leather jacket and all.

Grand Theft Auto 3 paid you for every bad deed you did. Every car you rammed you got paid. The more destruction the more money you got, the missions paid well too. Each mission introduced you to new characters who were just as evil as Liberty City, the place you were given to roam around freely.

The game also showed that you cannot trust anyone. You could get your back stabbed in a second in Liberty City. Trust the wrong man and you get blown up in a car. Fall in love with the wrong woman and you end up in jail.

After GTA III’s critical success, and shock, there could only be a sequel. Tommy Vercetti entered the picture with a pistol in his hand and a missing case of cocaine he had to find. He took the player into a world more crazy than the one in the previous game.

Grand Theft Auto Vice City was filled with so many Scarface and Carlito’s Way references that I felt I was somehow in those movies. Tommy’s mansion looked just like Tony Montana’s from Scarface. Ken Rosenberg is basically Sean Penn’s character from Carlito’s Way.

Vice City was a place filled with 1980’s culture, cocaine in everyone’s nose and “I Ran (So Far Away)” on every radio station. It was in full contrast to Liberty City in GTA III which was a grim version of New York where Vice City had beaches with women in bikinis prancing about with a sexy strut. Tourists with their cameras walked the main strip looking all about like they were dazzled by the seedy scenery.

Comedy was at an all time high in Vice City. Jokes were placed everywhere. Places were named crazy things along with people. Pole Position was the local strip club where a woman in a white cowboy hat would dance for you for the right price of course. But what always made me laugh the most was Tommy’s interactions with record producer Kent Paul. He was always beating him up for almost no reason at all. The porn producer is the easiest character to quote from the whole game though. He had an obsession with sharks and tried to put one in every porn film he made. Then there was the rock band Love Fist who had the thickest British accent in the world, subtitles were always needed for these guys.

Ever since Vice City came out the Grand Theft Auto games have gained in themes. Characters became more serious with deeper stories behind them. By GTA IV the series almost lost the whole comedy element, it still remains but only slightly. Rockstar, the creators of the games, still push buttons with these games though. Unfortunately with every new release someone has to complain. It’s gotten to the point that every murderer’s house is searched thoroughly for a GTA game to blame the motive of the killing on. Games do not kill people; games do not make a person go out in hopes of recreating what they just played. I don’t see every Call of Duty fan joining the military just because they felt a rush from the simulated battle they were just in.

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